Endometrial Cancer or Uterine Cancer

Endometrial Cancer or Uterine Cancer

What is endometrial cancer or uterine cancer

With 5,000 new cases each year, endometrial cancer, also known as uterine cancer, is poorly known and often confused with cervical cancer. However, these two pathologies are very different from each other! Here's all there is to know about endometrial cancer!

Cancer of the endometrium, or cancer of the uterus, in a few words

Due to an excess of estrogen, this pathology, which affects the lining of the interior of the uterus, rarely occurs before menopause. Endometrial cancer has no distinctively distinctive symptoms. However, some symptoms can alert you. Thus, this pathology is often treated early, which allows it to be one of the cancers that heals best.

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Symptoms and diagnosis

The main warning symptom is abnormal bleeding from the uterus. Remember that this cancer affects a large majority of menopausal women for whom any vaginal bleeding must also be reported to a doctor. Urinary tract infections or stomach pain often accompanied by fever should also be alert.

Although endometrial cancer affects the uterus, the recommended cervico-vaginal smear does not detect it. This pathology does not have a screening procedure, however, there is an examination to make a first diagnosis. The doctor will then recommend an endometrial biopsy and may also perform a pelvic ultrasound. If necessary, other examinations may be conducted to define in particular the progress of the disease.

Treatments of Uterine Cancer

Whatever the advance of the cancer, the surgery is inevitable for those wishing to have all the chances to cure. The procedure involves the removal of the uterus, called hysterectomy, which results in sterility of the patient. Depending on the stage of the disease, this treatment may be sufficient for healing. If this is not the case, the remaining cancer cells can be treated with chemotherapy or pelvic radiation to disintegrate them. These treatments are not trivial; it is important to learn about their side effects.

In short, it is important to be warned about endometrial cancer and especially during menopause, where any vaginal bleeding is suspicious!

Radiotherapy

After early stage endometrial carcinoma surgery, you may be offered radiation therapy to reduce the risk of recurrence. In the case of stage 2 carcinoma, radiation therapy is sometimes also given before surgery.

Radiation therapy can also be the main treatment for women who cannot get surgery because of other medical conditions.

You may receive external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy or both.

Chemotherapy

You may be offered chemotherapy after surgery for early-stage and high-grade endometrial carcinoma (such as serous adenocarcinoma or clear cell adenocarcinoma). Carcinosarcoma can also be treated with chemotherapy after surgery.

Chemotherapeutic agents used to treat high grade carcinoma include:

cisplatin (Platinol AQ)

carboplatin (Paraplatin, Paraplatin AQ) combined with paclitaxel (Taxol)

The chemotherapeutic agents used to treat carcinosarcoma include ifosfamide (Ifex) used alone or in combination with cisplatin, carboplatin, doxorubicin (Adriamycin) or paclitaxel.

Certain types of uterine cancer are treated by chemo radiotherapy, which consists of administering chemotherapy and radiotherapy during the same period.

It also happens that we give a few cycles of chemotherapy, then radiotherapy, then some other cycles of chemotherapy. This is called sandwich processing. It may be used to treat certain endometrial carcinomas, such as serous papillary carcinoma and carcinosarcoma.

Advanced endometrial carcinoma

The following treatments may be used for Stage 3 and Stage 4 endometrial carcinoma. Treatment for stage 4 endometrial carcinoma is designed to control the disease and relieve symptoms.

Endometrial Cancer or Uterine Cancer

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Surgery

Staging is performed during an operation. The surgeon performs a pelvic exam, which is performed under general anesthesia. Then he makes an incision (cut) in the abdomen to examine the organs and see if the cancer has spread there. This is called an exploration of the abdomen (laparotomy). The surgeon could take tissue samples and lymph nodes. It may also rinse the abdomen with saline and retain a sample of the rinsing fluid (pelvic lavage). Tissue samples, lymph nodes and pelvic lavage fluid are sent to a laboratory where they are examined under a microscope for cancer cells. This operation can also be performed using less invasive methods such as laparoscopy or robotic surgery.

Surgery is the primary treatment for stage 3 endometrial carcinoma. Total hysterectomy or radical hysterectomy is performed and lymph nodes are removed from the pelvis and around the aorta. The surgeon can also remove the momentum and biopsy any abnormal tissue present in the abdomen during surgery.

Tumor reduction involves removing as much of the tumor as possible. Tumor reduction may be proposed when stage 4 endometrial carcinoma has spread throughout the pelvis (extended pelvic disease) or upper abdomen. The purpose of this procedure is to help relieve the pain and symptoms caused by the tumor.

Hormone

You may be offered hormone therapy to treat stage 3 endometrial carcinoma if you can not have surgery or receive radiation therapy. Hormone therapy can also be used to help relieve symptoms caused by distant metastases of stage 4 endometrial carcinoma.

The main types of hormonal therapy used are megestrol (Megace, Apo-megestrol, Nu-megestrol, Lin-megestrol) and medroxyprogesterone (Provera). Other types of hormone therapy used to treat endometrial carcinoma include:

anastrozole (Arimidex)

Letrozole (Femara)

exemestane (Aromasin)

tamoxifen (Nolvadex, Tamofen)

Goserelin (Zoladex)

Leuprolide (Lupron, Lupron Depot, Eligard)

Radiotherapy

Radiation therapy may be proposed to treat advanced endometrial carcinoma. You may receive external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy or both. Radiation therapy can be given:

if you cannot have surgery because of other medical conditions

after surgery

to treat extended pelvic disease

to control symptoms such as heavy vaginal bleeding

before surgery (in some cases)

Chemotherapy

You may be offered chemotherapy after surgery for stage 3 and high grade endometrial carcinoma (such as serous adenocarcinoma or clear cell adenocarcinoma). Advanced carcinosarcoma can also be treated with chemotherapy after surgery. The chemotherapeutic agents used to treat carcinosarcoma or carcinoma of the stage 3 and high grade endometrium are the same as those used for the treatment of early stages. As with the treatment of carcinosarcoma or carcinoma of the early and high-grade endometrium, chemo radiotherapy or sandwich therapy may be used.

Chemotherapy could be proposed as a treatment for stage 4 endometrial carcinoma to help relieve symptoms caused by distant metastases. The chemotherapeutic combinations used include:

cisplatin and doxorubicin (Adriamycin), with or without paclitaxel

carboplatin and paclitaxel

carboplatin and docetaxel (Taxotere)

Recurrent carcinoma of the endometrium

The following treatment options may be available for recurrent renal cell carcinoma. Recurrence of endometrial carcinoma means that the cancer recurs after being treated. The treatment depends on the location of the recurrence and its extent in the body.

Radiotherapy

We could offer you radiotherapy after a tumor reduction surgery if the carcinoma of the endometrium reappears only in the pelvis (locoregional recurrence). Radiation therapy may also be available if you have extensive pelvic disease and you cannot have surgery because of other medical conditions.

You may receive external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy or both.

Endometrial Cancer or Uterine Cancer

Surgery

You may be offered one of the following types of surgery to treat recurrent carcinoma of the endometrium.

Pelvic exenteration is used to treat local recurrence when your rectum or bladder is affected and you have already received radiation therapy.

Tumor reduction is used if you have extensive pelvic disease. This surgical procedure helps relieve the pain and symptoms caused by the tumor.

Hormone

Hormone therapy may be proposed to control the growth of recurrent endometrial carcinoma or to help relieve symptoms caused by distant metastases. If you cannot have surgery, hormone therapy may be associated with radiation therapy.

The types of hormone therapy used are the same as those used to treat advanced endometrial carcinoma.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy may be proposed to control the growth of recurrent endometrial carcinoma or to help relieve symptoms caused by distant metastases. The chemotherapeutic combinations used include:

cisplatin and doxorubicin, with or without paclitaxel

carboplatin and paclitaxel

carboplatin and docetaxel

The chemotherapeutic agents used to treat carcinosarcoma or recurrent high-grade endometrial carcinoma are the same as those used for the other stages. As for the treatment of carcinosarcoma or carcinoma of the advanced or early stage high grade endometrium, chemo radiotherapy or sandwich therapy may be used.

If you cannot or do not want to receive cancer treatment

You may want to consider care that is designed to make you feel better rather than treat the cancer itself, perhaps because cancer treatments no longer work, and are no longer likely to improve your cancer. condition or that their side effects are difficult to tolerate. Other reasons may explain why you cannot or do not want to receive cancer treatment.

Discuss with members of your health care team. They can help you choose care and treatment for advanced cancer.

Clinical tests

You may be asked if you want to participate in a clinical trial on endometrial carcinoma. Learn more about clinical trials.

Endometrial Cancer or Uterine Cancer

Please if you have any questions about Endometrial Cancer or Uterine Cancer, you can ask us by commenting below this text, we'll answer you as soon as possible.

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